+ Bonnaroo

i am a very lame person who went to a very cool festival alone. i write for wers fm and edit for the deli new england.

here are forty acts i saw in four days.

(photo from SPIN)
Hey! Jamie here. This about wraps it for me— forty posts didn’t cut it, and so I’m wrapping up the Bonnaroo blog with a forty-sixth and final post by letting you know what I missed so you don’t have to. To everyone who’s been following along, thanks so much! I can be found here on a semi-regular basis, but if you want to talk I’m always on Twitter and reachable via email at jamieloftus8@gmail.com. Have a good life, babes!
WHAT I MISSED THAT PROBABLY KICKED ASS:
Ranch Ghost
HAIM
Django Django
The Stepkids
The Polyphonic Spree (St. Vincent is an alum, y’all)
Glen Hansard
Wu-Tang Clan
Gov’t Mule
Lee Fields & The Expressions
Holy Ghost!
Divine Fits
Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
Kendrick Lamar
Weird Al Yankovic
Bjork
Beach House
Amadou and Mariam
Animal Collective
and, on a final note, let’s be honest: Jack Johnson?
Thanks for reading! xoxoxox

(photo from SPIN)

Hey! Jamie here. This about wraps it for me— forty posts didn’t cut it, and so I’m wrapping up the Bonnaroo blog with a forty-sixth and final post by letting you know what I missed so you don’t have to. To everyone who’s been following along, thanks so much! I can be found here on a semi-regular basis, but if you want to talk I’m always on Twitter and reachable via email at jamieloftus8@gmail.com. Have a good life, babes!

WHAT I MISSED THAT PROBABLY KICKED ASS:

Ranch Ghost

HAIM

Django Django

The Stepkids

The Polyphonic Spree (St. Vincent is an alum, y’all)

Glen Hansard

Wu-Tang Clan

Gov’t Mule

Lee Fields & The Expressions

Holy Ghost!

Divine Fits

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis

Kendrick Lamar

Weird Al Yankovic

Bjork

Beach House

Amadou and Mariam

Animal Collective

and, on a final note, let’s be honest: Jack Johnson?

Thanks for reading! xoxoxox

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#Bonnaroo  #fuck jack johnson  #Ranch Ghost  #HAIM  #Django Django  #The Stepkids  #The Polyphonic Spree  #St. Vincent  #Glen Hansard  #Wu-Tang Clan  #Gov't Mule  #Lee Fields  #Holy Ghost!  #Divine Fits  #Spoon  #Macklemore  #Ryan Lewis  #Weird Al  #Bjork  #Beach House  #Amadou and Mariam  #Jack Johnson 
(photo from The Crosby Press)
#45 SATURDAY NIGHT SUPERJAM (SATURDAY)
The Bonnaroo Rock N’ Soul Dance Party is the stuff of legends— there’s no other festival that takes advantage of having hundreds of the world’s most talented musicians in one place as a chance to do something new, and a hip-hop Superjam had already been attempted the night before with Wu-Tang and Solange. Saturday ended up being the night to remember, though, helmed by the unlikely duo of John Oates and Jim James (frontman for My Morning Jacket). The theme they settled on was old-school soul and a Woodstock vibe, bringing out three incredible guests to put on arguably the most innovative, exclusive show of the festival.
After warming up the crowd with their bizarre musical styles clashing— Oates from an Americana-funk, Jim James coming off the dreamy electronic solo material he’d performed the day before, the guys ushered R. Kelly onstage to croon “A Change is Gonna Come” and “Bring It On Home” like the insane angel he is, only minutes after wrapping a set on Which Stage. Billy Idol must have jogged over from his late-night gig as well, showing up in full-on 80’s punk attire to blast his way through T. Rex’s “Bang a Gong” backed by James and Oates.
By this time, four Bonnaroo artists were onstage in a never-before-seen lineup, but the surprise that got the crowd screaming their heads off was the appearance of Alabama Shakes frontwoman Brittany Howard to join in on a four-song Sly and the Family Stone block. Alabama Shakes played the fest in 2012 to promote their debut album, but had no intention to appear this year— Howard was all smiles to take the stage at This Tent, shouting “Thank God, Bonnaroo!” before ripping through “Everyday People”, “Family Affair”, and “I Want to Take You Higher”. There wasn’t an unhappy human in the crowd, everyone jumping to the beat of their favorite artist’s guitar (and there were many), with the jam extending a full half hour past expected runtime. Who gives a damn? The Superjam is one of Bonnaroo’s most brilliant innovations, and the bar is set somewhere in the upper stratosphere for 2014.

(photo from The Crosby Press)

#45 SATURDAY NIGHT SUPERJAM (SATURDAY)

The Bonnaroo Rock N’ Soul Dance Party is the stuff of legends— there’s no other festival that takes advantage of having hundreds of the world’s most talented musicians in one place as a chance to do something new, and a hip-hop Superjam had already been attempted the night before with Wu-Tang and Solange. Saturday ended up being the night to remember, though, helmed by the unlikely duo of John Oates and Jim James (frontman for My Morning Jacket). The theme they settled on was old-school soul and a Woodstock vibe, bringing out three incredible guests to put on arguably the most innovative, exclusive show of the festival.

After warming up the crowd with their bizarre musical styles clashing— Oates from an Americana-funk, Jim James coming off the dreamy electronic solo material he’d performed the day before, the guys ushered R. Kelly onstage to croon “A Change is Gonna Come” and “Bring It On Home” like the insane angel he is, only minutes after wrapping a set on Which Stage. Billy Idol must have jogged over from his late-night gig as well, showing up in full-on 80’s punk attire to blast his way through T. Rex’s “Bang a Gong” backed by James and Oates.

By this time, four Bonnaroo artists were onstage in a never-before-seen lineup, but the surprise that got the crowd screaming their heads off was the appearance of Alabama Shakes frontwoman Brittany Howard to join in on a four-song Sly and the Family Stone block. Alabama Shakes played the fest in 2012 to promote their debut album, but had no intention to appear this year— Howard was all smiles to take the stage at This Tent, shouting “Thank God, Bonnaroo!” before ripping through “Everyday People”, “Family Affair”, and “I Want to Take You Higher”. There wasn’t an unhappy human in the crowd, everyone jumping to the beat of their favorite artist’s guitar (and there were many), with the jam extending a full half hour past expected runtime. Who gives a damn? The Superjam is one of Bonnaroo’s most brilliant innovations, and the bar is set somewhere in the upper stratosphere for 2014.

— 1 year ago
#Sly and the Family Stone  #Billy Idol  #R Kelly  #Alabama Shakes  #Brittany Howard  #Woodstock  #Motown  #Solange  #Wu-Tang  #John Oates  #Hall and Oates  #My Morning Jacket  #Jim James  #Which Stage  #This Tent  #Bonnaroo 
(photo from Crave Online)
#44 PASSION PIT (FRIDAY)
"I’m gonna go check out Passion Pit at the What Stage," a guy in a cutoff tank top could be heard saying between bites of seven-dollar hot dog. "I hear the lead singer’s gonna kill himself or something, so we should see them while it’s still a thing." Okay, that’s not very cool.
It’s true that Michael Angelakos has come public about his struggle with bipolar disorder while forging ahead with Cambridge-born Passion Pit (yay for Boston doing stuff right!), but that doesn’t take away from his undeniable knack for performance and blending electro-pop with themes of immigration, alcoholism, and self-loathing. Though 2012’sGossamercertainly didn’t break any sales records or create the buzz that 2009 debutMannershad, Angelakos and the PP crew balanced their set well between the two and spoon-fed fans their favorites via “Little Secrets”, “Take A Walk”, and most recent single “Carried Away”.
It’s true that their frontman did seem a little burned out when addressing the crowd between songs on one of the What Stage’s first performances, but he hopped and maintained his falsetto accordingly through the set, offering no surprises but a solid show. If you’re not a born again fan, the constant synth hooks wear on you after a half hour or so, but Passion Pit knows that everyone is waiting to hear breakout track “Sleepyhead”, so I found myself bobbing my head through the newGossamertracks to the end of the show and took a real listen to Angelako’s tortured lyrics.
"I’m so self-loathing it’s hard for me to see," he explains in "I’ll Be Alright", but even these words are trapped within the confines of an ever-looping pop chorus, making the result more of an experiment in whether anyone’s listening past the electonic beat than the dance hit it became. Angelakos may not be the synth-y Jim Morrison he’s going for, but you should still check out Passion Pit on the grounds that they’re a good group, not because one of them might die someday maybe. Seems fair, right?

(photo from Crave Online)

#44 PASSION PIT (FRIDAY)

"I’m gonna go check out Passion Pit at the What Stage," a guy in a cutoff tank top could be heard saying between bites of seven-dollar hot dog. "I hear the lead singer’s gonna kill himself or something, so we should see them while it’s still a thing." Okay, that’s not very cool.

It’s true that Michael Angelakos has come public about his struggle with bipolar disorder while forging ahead with Cambridge-born Passion Pit (yay for Boston doing stuff right!), but that doesn’t take away from his undeniable knack for performance and blending electro-pop with themes of immigration, alcoholism, and self-loathing. Though 2012’sGossamercertainly didn’t break any sales records or create the buzz that 2009 debutMannershad, Angelakos and the PP crew balanced their set well between the two and spoon-fed fans their favorites via “Little Secrets”, “Take A Walk”, and most recent single “Carried Away”.

It’s true that their frontman did seem a little burned out when addressing the crowd between songs on one of the What Stage’s first performances, but he hopped and maintained his falsetto accordingly through the set, offering no surprises but a solid show. If you’re not a born again fan, the constant synth hooks wear on you after a half hour or so, but Passion Pit knows that everyone is waiting to hear breakout track “Sleepyhead”, so I found myself bobbing my head through the newGossamertracks to the end of the show and took a real listen to Angelako’s tortured lyrics.

"I’m so self-loathing it’s hard for me to see," he explains in "I’ll Be Alright", but even these words are trapped within the confines of an ever-looping pop chorus, making the result more of an experiment in whether anyone’s listening past the electonic beat than the dance hit it became. Angelakos may not be the synth-y Jim Morrison he’s going for, but you should still check out Passion Pit on the grounds that they’re a good group, not because one of them might die someday maybe. Seems fair, right?

— 1 year ago with 45 notes
#Passion Pit  #Gossamer  #Sleepyhead  #Michael Angelakos 
(photo from Crave Online)
#43 EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS (SUNDAY)
Have we reached a point where we can legally change Alex Ebert’s name to Edward Sharpe or switch the name to Ebert and the Magnetic Wifebeaters? After six years in and out of the lineup, the character of Edward has consumed the group completely, making every show a barefooted, lace-clad celebration of family. Edward Ebert and his Magnetic Zeros took the Which Stage on the final day of Bonnaroo with no less than eight people onstage to cover everything from the acoustic to the clarinet to create the full, campfire sound of “Janglin’” and “That’s What’s Up” with vocalist and lover? best friend? Jade Castrinos.
Opener “40 Day Dream” set the tone for the hour or so the group played from their two studio releases, opting to withhold tracks from the self-titled release slotted for July 23rd. A three-year Bonnaroo vet, Ebert knows what he’s doing when it comes to delivering beard-raggled, hippie-skipping hits like the smash “Home” andUp From Belowsingle “Man on Fire”, but an audience member can’t help but wonder if the label is requesting they hold back the new music a few more weeks. Eber has been quoted as saying the new material “means everything— the most rambunctious stuff we’ve done”, and leaving fans without a taste stung a little.
But who’s about to complain when Ebert and Castrinos are staring deeply into one anothers eyes telling each other “Home is whenever I’m with you”? The Magnetic Zeros have a bizarre, magical way of making the crowd feel like they’ve stumbled into a hippie commune instead of a high-profile festival, as the band barely pays attention to anyone but each other. This exclusivity makes you want to jump up onstage with them, forsake your 9-5, and stop showering to become another pawn in the weird, sweet hokiness of it all.

(photo from Crave Online)

#43 EDWARD SHARPE AND THE MAGNETIC ZEROS (SUNDAY)

Have we reached a point where we can legally change Alex Ebert’s name to Edward Sharpe or switch the name to Ebert and the Magnetic Wifebeaters? After six years in and out of the lineup, the character of Edward has consumed the group completely, making every show a barefooted, lace-clad celebration of family. Edward Ebert and his Magnetic Zeros took the Which Stage on the final day of Bonnaroo with no less than eight people onstage to cover everything from the acoustic to the clarinet to create the full, campfire sound of “Janglin’” and “That’s What’s Up” with vocalist and lover? best friend? Jade Castrinos.

Opener “40 Day Dream” set the tone for the hour or so the group played from their two studio releases, opting to withhold tracks from the self-titled release slotted for July 23rd. A three-year Bonnaroo vet, Ebert knows what he’s doing when it comes to delivering beard-raggled, hippie-skipping hits like the smash “Home” andUp From Belowsingle “Man on Fire”, but an audience member can’t help but wonder if the label is requesting they hold back the new music a few more weeks. Eber has been quoted as saying the new material “means everything— the most rambunctious stuff we’ve done”, and leaving fans without a taste stung a little.

But who’s about to complain when Ebert and Castrinos are staring deeply into one anothers eyes telling each other “Home is whenever I’m with you”? The Magnetic Zeros have a bizarre, magical way of making the crowd feel like they’ve stumbled into a hippie commune instead of a high-profile festival, as the band barely pays attention to anyone but each other. This exclusivity makes you want to jump up onstage with them, forsake your 9-5, and stop showering to become another pawn in the weird, sweet hokiness of it all.

— 1 year ago with 3 notes
#Alex Ebert  #Jade Castinos  #Edward Sharpe  #Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros  #Home  #Man on Fire  #Bonnaroo  #Which Stage 
(photo from SPIN)
#42 JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD (SUNDAY)
JEFF the Brotherhood is one of the most prolific touring acts going in the U.S., hitting up every dive club and, slowly, bigger and bigger stage in the country and finally hit Bonnaroo on three different stages throughout this year’s festival. They had already performed in 2011 on a tiny stage, but the brothers (Jake and Jamin Orall) were deservedly upped to a slot at This Tent in their home state of Tennessee to play songs from all over their eleven-year career.
Known for frequent collaborations with other pseudo-punk acts like Ty Segall and Screaming Females, 2012’sHypnotic Nightswas a big focus in this powerhouse set, being the first to scrape the Billboard charts at #198. In spite of their obvious hardworking roots, JEFF’s lyrics remain accessible to every dude that has ever dude-d on “Sixpack” and “Stay Up Late”— “Lets load the car up / I got a bag of ice / I got a six pack / And I don’t want to go back”. Sound familiar? Sporting their classic Goodwill look, the brothers laughed and pogo-ed their way through a sweaty set that got as close to a mosh pit as any Bonnaroo set ever had.
"We’ve played here before," Jake said, peeking over the crowd, "but this is nice, pretty big. All right, let’s go." Leaving the talking to the crowd, JEFF and their backing band alternated between punk and surf rock with the same forward momentum. They’re the sort of band that’s going to tour and write the best basement party soundtracks in the universe whether they ever break through to the mainstream in a big way or not, and there’s an old-school rock star attitude about that that endears and encourages the brothers.
(Note: JEFF wasn’t on my original must-see lineup until I remembered seeing this picture from Great Scott in Allston last year. You have to.)

(photo from SPIN)

#42 JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD (SUNDAY)

JEFF the Brotherhood is one of the most prolific touring acts going in the U.S., hitting up every dive club and, slowly, bigger and bigger stage in the country and finally hit Bonnaroo on three different stages throughout this year’s festival. They had already performed in 2011 on a tiny stage, but the brothers (Jake and Jamin Orall) were deservedly upped to a slot at This Tent in their home state of Tennessee to play songs from all over their eleven-year career.

Known for frequent collaborations with other pseudo-punk acts like Ty Segall and Screaming Females, 2012’sHypnotic Nightswas a big focus in this powerhouse set, being the first to scrape the Billboard charts at #198. In spite of their obvious hardworking roots, JEFF’s lyrics remain accessible to every dude that has ever dude-d on “Sixpack” and “Stay Up Late”— “Lets load the car up / I got a bag of ice / I got a six pack / And I don’t want to go back”. Sound familiar? Sporting their classic Goodwill look, the brothers laughed and pogo-ed their way through a sweaty set that got as close to a mosh pit as any Bonnaroo set ever had.

"We’ve played here before," Jake said, peeking over the crowd, "but this is nice, pretty big. All right, let’s go." Leaving the talking to the crowd, JEFF and their backing band alternated between punk and surf rock with the same forward momentum. They’re the sort of band that’s going to tour and write the best basement party soundtracks in the universe whether they ever break through to the mainstream in a big way or not, and there’s an old-school rock star attitude about that that endears and encourages the brothers.

(Note: JEFF wasn’t on my original must-see lineup until I remembered seeing this picture from Great Scott in Allston last year. You have to.)

— 1 year ago with 6 notes
#JEFF the brotherhood  #third man records  #jack white  #jake orrall  #jamin orrall  #hypnotic nights  #we are the champions  #bonnaroo 
(photo from PopMatters)
#41 TALLEST MAN ON EARTH (SATURDAY)
Okay, okay. I said forty, but it turns out that there’s too much goodness to talk about, so we’re upping the ante. Swede Kristian Mattson, operating under the moniker “The Tallest Man on Earth” since 2006, singlehandedly embodies the Bonnaroovian spirit— he’s practically coated in granola and good vibes, and always had a positive message before launching into the next dreamy acoustic number. “It’s hot as hell out here, do you mind if I…” he asked, slipping off his shirt and playing the remainder of the set in only a wifebeater. Well played, well played.
Though his 2012 albumThere’s No Leaving Nowwas most heavily featured with singles like “1904” and “Revelation Blues” resonating with the crowd, the Tallest Man played a decent spread across his three studio albums, sprinkling in bonus tracks from long-forgotten EPs and an acoustic cover of “Graceland” to close his set. For Mattson, the emphasis always remains on the relationship of sweaty guy with a guitar— he notoriously refuses to record his voice and acoustic on separate tracks during studio sessions, and didn’t bother with the frills of a backing band for his Bonnaroo appearance. Given the intense showmanship and light shows put on by the larger acts, this was a breath of fresh air in the muggy Friday weather with nothing to focus on but the guy, the sound, and his admittedly brilliant lyrics on tracks “The King of Spain”.
The concept of Tallest Man constantly teeters between organic and overbearing, but the performance is there whether you’re a fan or not—There’s No Leaving Nowis his strongest effort to date, and Matsson has nowhere to go but up.

(photo from PopMatters)

#41 TALLEST MAN ON EARTH (SATURDAY)

Okay, okay. I said forty, but it turns out that there’s too much goodness to talk about, so we’re upping the ante. Swede Kristian Mattson, operating under the moniker “The Tallest Man on Earth” since 2006, singlehandedly embodies the Bonnaroovian spirit— he’s practically coated in granola and good vibes, and always had a positive message before launching into the next dreamy acoustic number. “It’s hot as hell out here, do you mind if I…” he asked, slipping off his shirt and playing the remainder of the set in only a wifebeater. Well played, well played.

Though his 2012 albumThere’s No Leaving Nowwas most heavily featured with singles like “1904” and “Revelation Blues” resonating with the crowd, the Tallest Man played a decent spread across his three studio albums, sprinkling in bonus tracks from long-forgotten EPs and an acoustic cover of “Graceland” to close his set. For Mattson, the emphasis always remains on the relationship of sweaty guy with a guitar— he notoriously refuses to record his voice and acoustic on separate tracks during studio sessions, and didn’t bother with the frills of a backing band for his Bonnaroo appearance. Given the intense showmanship and light shows put on by the larger acts, this was a breath of fresh air in the muggy Friday weather with nothing to focus on but the guy, the sound, and his admittedly brilliant lyrics on tracks “The King of Spain”.

The concept of Tallest Man constantly teeters between organic and overbearing, but the performance is there whether you’re a fan or not—There’s No Leaving Nowis his strongest effort to date, and Matsson has nowhere to go but up.

— 1 year ago with 5 notes
#Tallest Man on Earth  #1904  #Bonnaroo  #Kristian Matsson  #There's No Leaving Now 
(photo from Pitchfork)
#40 TAME IMPALA (SUNDAY)
"You’ve seen them twice!" I told myself. “You’re going to get sick of Lonerism sometime!” I said. “You’ll leave and catch the end of the Magnetic Zeros!” I said. I was wrong, but it’s only because Kevin Parker is psych Jesus and that’s not my fault.
There is nothing I don’t love about Tame Impala—whether it’s their consistently lava lamp-y videos, their psych basslines, or their Australian willingness to wear floral scarves, they are consistently my favorite live group on the planet and are the East’s Zeppelin. Just as at Primavera, the five-piece group led by Kevin Parker (pictured) paid tribute to Zeppelin to open their set, then launching straight into “Solitude is Bliss” from 2010’sInnerspeaker.The guitar-reponsive LED display remains from their 2013 world tour, pulsing along with the live sound and older tracks like “It Is Not Meant to Be” and “Auto-Prog”.
Unlike the vast majority of psychadelic outfits getting traction, TI avoids the expected, song-into-the-next-song concert format and took ample time to banter with the audience between songs. “This is our first Bonnaroo,” Parker explained, “and we haven’t played in two weeks, so we’ll see how this goes.” It goes perfect, Tame Impala, it always does.
Not surprisingly,Lonerismtracks registered with fans and the band the most in the sea of lights and monitors, with Australian chart toppers like “Feels Like We Only Go Backwards” killed and the band’s extended “Elephant” synth solo fooled the crowd into believing the song would never reach a satisfactory conclusion. “Mind Mischief” and “Music To Walk Home To”, second-rung favorites, also hit with the already-swooning crowd, but the decision to encore with 2008’s hit “Half Full Glass of Wine” is what cinches it for these guys. Their sound manages to be consistent without getting boring after six years on the charts, and even though there’s still someLonerismhype to ride out, I can only hope they’ll find a reason to return to the states sooner rather than later.

(photo from Pitchfork)

#40 TAME IMPALA (SUNDAY)


"You’ve seen them twice!" I told myself. “You’re going to get sick of Lonerism sometime!” I said. “You’ll leave and catch the end of the Magnetic Zeros!” I said. I was wrong, but it’s only because Kevin Parker is psych Jesus and that’s not my fault.

There is nothing I don’t love about Tame Impala—whether it’s their consistently lava lamp-y videos, their psych basslines, or their Australian willingness to wear floral scarves, they are consistently my favorite live group on the planet and are the East’s Zeppelin. Just as at Primavera, the five-piece group led by Kevin Parker (pictured) paid tribute to Zeppelin to open their set, then launching straight into “Solitude is Bliss” from 2010’sInnerspeaker.The guitar-reponsive LED display remains from their 2013 world tour, pulsing along with the live sound and older tracks like “It Is Not Meant to Be” and “Auto-Prog”.

Unlike the vast majority of psychadelic outfits getting traction, TI avoids the expected, song-into-the-next-song concert format and took ample time to banter with the audience between songs. “This is our first Bonnaroo,” Parker explained, “and we haven’t played in two weeks, so we’ll see how this goes.” It goes perfect, Tame Impala, it always does.

Not surprisingly,Lonerismtracks registered with fans and the band the most in the sea of lights and monitors, with Australian chart toppers like “Feels Like We Only Go Backwards” killed and the band’s extended “Elephant” synth solo fooled the crowd into believing the song would never reach a satisfactory conclusion. “Mind Mischief” and “Music To Walk Home To”, second-rung favorites, also hit with the already-swooning crowd, but the decision to encore with 2008’s hit “Half Full Glass of Wine” is what cinches it for these guys. Their sound manages to be consistent without getting boring after six years on the charts, and even though there’s still someLonerismhype to ride out, I can only hope they’ll find a reason to return to the states sooner rather than later.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#Tame Impala  #Bonnaroo  #Kevin Parker  #Elephant  #Lonerism  #Perth 
(photo from Rolling Stone)
#39 JD MCPHERSON (THURSDAY)
All you need to know about seeing JD McPherson is that the recordings hide nothing— he’s really just that good. Flanked by a five-piece brass ensemble, one wouldn’t guess that thirty-six-year-old McPherson spent his twenties in and out of southern punk bands, getting a degree in visual arts, and working as an art teacher, but the success of debut Signs and Signifiers seems to have changed his tune. In retrospect, making the switch to roots music may have been his best call thus far, and he’s made everyone’s list for best throwback sound with vocals undeniably made for the genre.
These vocals are nothing without his electric guitar married to the alto and baritone saxes, some keys, and a trombone solo here and there during his Thursday afternoon set. Instead of adding songs to the set to meet his hour, McPherson opted to give and take extended solos in now-signature tracks like “North Side Gal” and “Firebug”, always quick with the southern charm between songs. “Mighty happy to be here,” he said with a genuine flash of teeth while a trombone tuned.
JD McPherson isn’t the high profile favorite he deserves to be yet, but remained one of the biggest names of the Bonnaroo Thursday bill and the perfect thing to get a whole crowd up and moving to some good old fashioned Americana, a genre largely missed out on amidst a sea of synth.

(photo from Rolling Stone)

#39 JD MCPHERSON (THURSDAY)

All you need to know about seeing JD McPherson is that the recordings hide nothing— he’s really just that good. Flanked by a five-piece brass ensemble, one wouldn’t guess that thirty-six-year-old McPherson spent his twenties in and out of southern punk bands, getting a degree in visual arts, and working as an art teacher, but the success of debut Signs and Signifiers seems to have changed his tune. In retrospect, making the switch to roots music may have been his best call thus far, and he’s made everyone’s list for best throwback sound with vocals undeniably made for the genre.

These vocals are nothing without his electric guitar married to the alto and baritone saxes, some keys, and a trombone solo here and there during his Thursday afternoon set. Instead of adding songs to the set to meet his hour, McPherson opted to give and take extended solos in now-signature tracks like “North Side Gal” and “Firebug”, always quick with the southern charm between songs. “Mighty happy to be here,” he said with a genuine flash of teeth while a trombone tuned.

JD McPherson isn’t the high profile favorite he deserves to be yet, but remained one of the biggest names of the Bonnaroo Thursday bill and the perfect thing to get a whole crowd up and moving to some good old fashioned Americana, a genre largely missed out on amidst a sea of synth.

— 1 year ago with 5 notes
#jd mcpherson  #north side gal  #firebug  #Bonnaroo 
(photo from Billboard)
#38 THE XX (FRIDAY)
The xx opened their late-night Friday set with sheepish apology after an hour and a half delay from the extended McCartney performance on the What Stage. “Sorry,” frontman Oliver Simtold an eager audience, “Paul McCartney wanted to rock, so what’re you going to do?” For the British trio, this is a rare display of humor that immediately faded into their stage personas— vocalists Sim and Romy Madley Cross and audio soundscapist Jamie Smith disappeared into a thick shroud of fog to play major tracks “Crystalised” and “Infinity”. This would be a strange choice for any other group on the lineup, but the xx make it work— for all intents and purposes, a thick shroud of fog isn’t an inaccurate description of their sound, accompanied with soaring, occasionally bored harmonies.
Though recent track “Together” (featured on The Great Gatsby soundtrack) and early success “Stars” remained conspicuously absent from the setlist, The xx split their hour onstage between their two critically adored albums, 2010 debut xx and last year’s Coexist. The latter of the two is music for the end of the world, sparse electronic wastelands populated only by Sims and Croft’s minimal vocals, sounding like a stripped and slowed down Kills album. When hearing heavy tracks like “Swept Away” and closer “Angels”, it’s hard to believe the group has only just cracked their twenties.
Their stage, unsurprisingly, stuck to the bare basics to ensure a near-continuous sound as audience members stretched on the dew-gathering grass, hitting an energy high with a cover of member Jamie xx’s track “Far Nearer”. They haven’t yet gotten labeled as moody one-trick ponies, and there’s more than enough time to break the mold— the xx is painfully cool, impossible to dance to, and prefer fog to laser shows, but what they really are is the same age as most of their fans still searching for a sound. In the meantime, they’re the only ones out there doing this type of minimalism with such success, so take notes.

(photo from Billboard)

#38 THE XX (FRIDAY)

The xx opened their late-night Friday set with sheepish apology after an hour and a half delay from the extended McCartney performance on the What Stage. “Sorry,” frontman Oliver Simtold an eager audience, “Paul McCartney wanted to rock, so what’re you going to do?” For the British trio, this is a rare display of humor that immediately faded into their stage personas— vocalists Sim and Romy Madley Cross and audio soundscapist Jamie Smith disappeared into a thick shroud of fog to play major tracks “Crystalised” and “Infinity”. This would be a strange choice for any other group on the lineup, but the xx make it work— for all intents and purposes, a thick shroud of fog isn’t an inaccurate description of their sound, accompanied with soaring, occasionally bored harmonies.

Though recent track “Together” (featured on The Great Gatsby soundtrack) and early success “Stars” remained conspicuously absent from the setlist, The xx split their hour onstage between their two critically adored albums, 2010 debut xx and last year’s Coexist. The latter of the two is music for the end of the world, sparse electronic wastelands populated only by Sims and Croft’s minimal vocals, sounding like a stripped and slowed down Kills album. When hearing heavy tracks like “Swept Away” and closer “Angels”, it’s hard to believe the group has only just cracked their twenties.

Their stage, unsurprisingly, stuck to the bare basics to ensure a near-continuous sound as audience members stretched on the dew-gathering grass, hitting an energy high with a cover of member Jamie xx’s track “Far Nearer”. They haven’t yet gotten labeled as moody one-trick ponies, and there’s more than enough time to break the mold— the xx is painfully cool, impossible to dance to, and prefer fog to laser shows, but what they really are is the same age as most of their fans still searching for a sound. In the meantime, they’re the only ones out there doing this type of minimalism with such success, so take notes.

— 1 year ago with 6 notes
#The xx  #Oliver Sim  #romy madley croft  #Jamie xx  #Bonnaroo  #The Great Gatsby  #Together  #Angels  #Crystalised  #Coexist 
(photo from americansongwriter.com)
#37 THE NATIONAL (SUNDAY)
I read somewhere, from someone funnier than I am, that The National’s music is perfect for being seduced by a vampire, and it kind of rings true— lead singer Matt Berninger’s spooky baritone and the creeping pace of most of their library makes The National less of a jam band, more one to stretch out on the grass and think about the great beyond, or, I don’t know, having sex with a vampire.
This year’s release Trouble Will Find Me, already charting with a vengeance and propelling the Ohioans to even loftier heights claimed the show with seven tracks performed during their hour and a half tenure at the Which Stage last Sunday, shortly before Tom Petty concluded the festival. Berninger expressed his gratefulness to be playing the festival’s largest stage between songs and made reference to his appearance earlier in the day to promote National doc Mistaken For Strangers (a track he then played), directed by his Jack Black caricature of a younger brother.
Despite their moody ambience, The National’s lyrics contain a melancholy that transcends the bleeding wrist goth indie they’re occasionally associated with. These are guys in their late thirties that have been struggling up the charts for over ten years and through six albums— they’re two sets of brothers and a Berninger with families and priorities more traditional than that of a spiky-haired Gerard Way. Trouble Will Find Me's leading single “Don't Swallow the Cap” sums them up perfectly: “I have only two emotions/Careful fear and dead devotion”. It’s not surface, but you still can’t help but be surprised that they’ve suddenly become one of the biggest names in the industry.
Berninger seems to feel the same way: “I would never have guessed that…well, you know,” he said, gesturing to the audience of thousands before shrugging and heading into the next track. The National sprinkled earlier hits like “Mr. Alligator”, “Fake Empire”, and a little song called “Bloodbuzz Ohio” between newer, barely exposed tracks, but fans were equally jazzed to hear anything. That’s the thing about these guys— if you’re a fan, it’s never in a small way, especially if you’re a horny vampire.
 

(photo from americansongwriter.com)

#37 THE NATIONAL (SUNDAY)


I read somewhere, from someone funnier than I am, that The National’s music is perfect for being seduced by a vampire, and it kind of rings true— lead singer Matt Berninger’s spooky baritone and the creeping pace of most of their library makes The National less of a jam band, more one to stretch out on the grass and think about the great beyond, or, I don’t know, having sex with a vampire.

This year’s release Trouble Will Find Me, already charting with a vengeance and propelling the Ohioans to even loftier heights claimed the show with seven tracks performed during their hour and a half tenure at the Which Stage last Sunday, shortly before Tom Petty concluded the festival. Berninger expressed his gratefulness to be playing the festival’s largest stage between songs and made reference to his appearance earlier in the day to promote National doc Mistaken For Strangers (a track he then played), directed by his Jack Black caricature of a younger brother.

Despite their moody ambience, The National’s lyrics contain a melancholy that transcends the bleeding wrist goth indie they’re occasionally associated with. These are guys in their late thirties that have been struggling up the charts for over ten years and through six albums— they’re two sets of brothers and a Berninger with families and priorities more traditional than that of a spiky-haired Gerard Way. Trouble Will Find Me's leading single “Don't Swallow the Cap” sums them up perfectly: “I have only two emotions/Careful fear and dead devotion”. It’s not surface, but you still can’t help but be surprised that they’ve suddenly become one of the biggest names in the industry.

Berninger seems to feel the same way: “I would never have guessed that…well, you know,” he said, gesturing to the audience of thousands before shrugging and heading into the next track. The National sprinkled earlier hits like “Mr. Alligator”, “Fake Empire”, and a little song called “Bloodbuzz Ohio” between newer, barely exposed tracks, but fans were equally jazzed to hear anything. That’s the thing about these guys— if you’re a fan, it’s never in a small way, especially if you’re a horny vampire.

 

— 1 year ago with 3 notes
#The National  #Don't Swallow the Cap  #Bonnaroo  #bloodbuzz ohio  #Trouble Will Find Me  #Matt Berninger  #aaron dessner  #bryce dessner  #scott devendorf  #bryan devendorf 
(photo from Redbull.com)
#36 FOALS (FRIDAY)
With some of the most eclectic, all-over-the-place sounds in recent memory, it was hard to guess whether English band Foals would be fun or profound to see perform live. Turns out it’s a little bit of both— they’re still riding out the hype from February’s release of Holy Fire and recently made their U.S. rounds with slow burning love songs and dancey songs about phone numbers. Yup, same band.
Holy Fire took precedence over their three past releases in the too-short set and Foals brought some serious volume (to Portugal. the man across the field’s chagrin), hitting its stride with fan favorites “My Number” and “Milk and Black Spiders”. It’s a more energized sound than they first rose to attention for, being defined by extended tracks like 2007’s “Spanish Sahara” (beautiful live) and their slower, more deliberate second and third efforts. This could easily confuse new converts to Foals’ growing fanbase, but their performance is so full of life from frontman Yannis Phillippakis and guitarist Jack Bevan especially that the pulsing drumbeat ties the library together, no matter what album you’re hearing from.
By the time the next Foals album is released, it wouldn’t be surprising to see Phillippakis’ gorgeous face pasted on every music rag and in the inexplicable collage you made for your college dorm room to have a little slice of home. For now, Bonnaroovians, languish in the superiority of knowing them when.

(photo from Redbull.com)

#36 FOALS (FRIDAY)


With some of the most eclectic, all-over-the-place sounds in recent memory, it was hard to guess whether English band Foals would be fun or profound to see perform live. Turns out it’s a little bit of both— they’re still riding out the hype from February’s release of Holy Fire and recently made their U.S. rounds with slow burning love songs and dancey songs about phone numbers. Yup, same band.

Holy Fire took precedence over their three past releases in the too-short set and Foals brought some serious volume (to Portugal. the man across the field’s chagrin), hitting its stride with fan favorites “My Number” and “Milk and Black Spiders”. It’s a more energized sound than they first rose to attention for, being defined by extended tracks like 2007’s “Spanish Sahara” (beautiful live) and their slower, more deliberate second and third efforts. This could easily confuse new converts to Foals’ growing fanbase, but their performance is so full of life from frontman Yannis Phillippakis and guitarist Jack Bevan especially that the pulsing drumbeat ties the library together, no matter what album you’re hearing from.

By the time the next Foals album is released, it wouldn’t be surprising to see Phillippakis’ gorgeous face pasted on every music rag and in the inexplicable collage you made for your college dorm room to have a little slice of home. For now, Bonnaroovians, languish in the superiority of knowing them when.

— 1 year ago with 4 notes
#Foals  #Bonnaroo  #yannis philippakis  #jack bevan  #walter gervers  #edwin congreave 
(photo from Vibe)
#35 SOLANGE (SATURDAY)
Solange Knowles doesn’t seem like the girl everyone can be friends with, and that’s meant in a good way. Dressed to the indie girl nines with an incredible range and dreamy filters set to R&B rhythms, her presence is cool and focused as she blasted through a set on the Which Stage in the hottest part of Bonnaroo’s Saturday.
By the time she performed a string of hits-to-be from album Sole Responsibility, she had already been the talk of Bonnaroo after taking the stage at Friday evening’s Superjam and with Grizzly Bear beau the day before for “Two Weeks”. Audiences buzzed with something Solange has been forced to become familiar with in her career of over a decade— instantaneous comparison to her powerhouse sister, but her voice is strong and music leanings different enough that these slowly hushed to bobbing heads as the set continued.
Though she treated fans to a few tracks from 2008’s Sol-Angel and The Hadley St Dreams, Knowles stuck to the new stuff with good reason— she’s put a lot of herself into deceptively simple dance lyrics. At the ripe age of twenty-six, Knowles already has a ten-year-old and a divorce under her belt, but you’d never know it from how she breezed and grooved to tracks “Losing You” “Locked in Closets”, and “Don’t Let Me Down”. The girl’s got style and range that’s bound to sustain her as she continues to float wisely outside of Beyonce’s circle, combining fashion and music to win the hearts of bloggers and indie crossover lovers alike.

(photo from Vibe)

#35 SOLANGE (SATURDAY)


Solange Knowles doesn’t seem like the girl everyone can be friends with, and that’s meant in a good way. Dressed to the indie girl nines with an incredible range and dreamy filters set to R&B rhythms, her presence is cool and focused as she blasted through a set on the Which Stage in the hottest part of Bonnaroo’s Saturday.

By the time she performed a string of hits-to-be from album Sole Responsibility, she had already been the talk of Bonnaroo after taking the stage at Friday evening’s Superjam and with Grizzly Bear beau the day before for “Two Weeks”. Audiences buzzed with something Solange has been forced to become familiar with in her career of over a decade— instantaneous comparison to her powerhouse sister, but her voice is strong and music leanings different enough that these slowly hushed to bobbing heads as the set continued.

Though she treated fans to a few tracks from 2008’s Sol-Angel and The Hadley St Dreams, Knowles stuck to the new stuff with good reason— she’s put a lot of herself into deceptively simple dance lyrics. At the ripe age of twenty-six, Knowles already has a ten-year-old and a divorce under her belt, but you’d never know it from how she breezed and grooved to tracks “Losing You” “Locked in Closets”, and “Don’t Let Me Down”. The girl’s got style and range that’s bound to sustain her as she continues to float wisely outside of Beyonce’s circle, combining fashion and music to win the hearts of bloggers and indie crossover lovers alike.

— 1 year ago with 20 notes
#Solange  #Beyonce  #Bonnaroo  #Grizzly Bear  #losing you  #fashion 
(photo from Billboard)
#34 TOM PETTY (SUNDAY)

You never, ever know how many Tom Petty songs you’ll recognize from the first six notes until you see him live. Whether it’s a snatch of a recalled song from a movie trailer (“Learning to Fly” and every movie ever produced since its release), a remembered chorus from your dad’s stereo or spending any time in a coffeehouse chain, you know ‘em all and Petty still has the pipes to deliver.
Petty took full advantage of being the last act of Bonnaroo, assuring the adoring masse he had “nowhere to be but here tonight, let’s do this right”. Some audience members couldn’t hold out for the whole three-hour set (myself included), but Petty’s lullabies carried us back to the campgrounds and long into the torture that is packing a heap of stinky clothes.
Not surprisingly, the Heartbreakers pulled a good deal of material from artist of their age to cover, opening with “So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star” (The Byrds), paying tribute to Big Joe Williams with “Baby, Please Don’t Go”, and a terrific rendition of the Dead’s “Friend of the Devil” in addition to a Traveling Wilburys track. Petty, sixty-two, has more energy than ever and (at risk of sounding like a grandfather kisser) looks absolutely amazing, appearing almost exactly as he did in the eighties. Does stoner rock make you immortal? Are stoner rockers less shy about Botox than one would think? Who cares, Petty is taking a solo on “Free Fallin’”.
"Here’s one we can all sing along to," Petty smiled before launching into "I Won’t Back Down", and the same could be said for so much of his library— "Here Comes My Girl", "Mary Jane’s Last Dance", "American Girl", "Refugee" (!!!!!), and "You Wreck Me" all graced the all-star song lineup. Held against the setlists he’s been taking around the country in his most recent tour, Bonnaroo’s show was far more generous in bringing the hits, but the covers and deep cuts were dispersed enough to (hopefully) satisfy the Heartbreakers’ sense of variety.
Friday night brought British legend McCartney to the What Stage, Saturday brought some disappointment when Jack Johnson subbed in for Mumford, and so it felt good to see one of the hugest American bands of all time close the festival in the heart of Tennessee. Like an obese apple pie wrapped in a flag paying off a college loan.

(photo from Billboard)

#34 TOM PETTY (SUNDAY)

You never, ever know how many Tom Petty songs you’ll recognize from the first six notes until you see him live. Whether it’s a snatch of a recalled song from a movie trailer (“Learning to Fly” and every movie ever produced since its release), a remembered chorus from your dad’s stereo or spending any time in a coffeehouse chain, you know ‘em all and Petty still has the pipes to deliver.

Petty took full advantage of being the last act of Bonnaroo, assuring the adoring masse he had “nowhere to be but here tonight, let’s do this right”. Some audience members couldn’t hold out for the whole three-hour set (myself included), but Petty’s lullabies carried us back to the campgrounds and long into the torture that is packing a heap of stinky clothes.

Not surprisingly, the Heartbreakers pulled a good deal of material from artist of their age to cover, opening with “So You Want to Be a Rock and Roll Star” (The Byrds), paying tribute to Big Joe Williams with “Baby, Please Don’t Go”, and a terrific rendition of the Dead’s “Friend of the Devil” in addition to a Traveling Wilburys track. Petty, sixty-two, has more energy than ever and (at risk of sounding like a grandfather kisser) looks absolutely amazing, appearing almost exactly as he did in the eighties. Does stoner rock make you immortal? Are stoner rockers less shy about Botox than one would think? Who cares, Petty is taking a solo on “Free Fallin’”.

"Here’s one we can all sing along to," Petty smiled before launching into "I Won’t Back Down", and the same could be said for so much of his library— "Here Comes My Girl", "Mary Jane’s Last Dance", "American Girl", "Refugee" (!!!!!), and "You Wreck Me" all graced the all-star song lineup. Held against the setlists he’s been taking around the country in his most recent tour, Bonnaroo’s show was far more generous in bringing the hits, but the covers and deep cuts were dispersed enough to (hopefully) satisfy the Heartbreakers’ sense of variety.

Friday night brought British legend McCartney to the What Stage, Saturday brought some disappointment when Jack Johnson subbed in for Mumford, and so it felt good to see one of the hugest American bands of all time close the festival in the heart of Tennessee. Like an obese apple pie wrapped in a flag paying off a college loan.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#Tom Petty  #the heartbreakers  #refugee  #paul mccartney  #jack johnson  #mumford and sons  #what stage  #bonnaroo 
(photo from SPIN)
#33 WILCO (FRIDAY)
Legends in their own right by now, it’s no surprise that Wilco were the final act to take the What Stage before Paul McCartney on Friday night of Bonnaroo, but they remained in awe. With nearly twenty years of material to pull from, frontman Jeff Tweedy expressed nothing but shock and flattery that they’d been chosen during their nineteen-song set. For the most part, Wilco stuck to the hits— six tracks from iconic Yankee Hotel Foxtrot were played to the audiences’ chagrin, including sing-along tracks “I Am Trying To Break Your Heart” and “Jesus, Etc.”. 
Tweedy is, admittedly, getting on in years, but maintained the mellow that made him famous with light stage banter and a sweet thankfulness that one wouldn’t jump to when thinking of a Chicago rock star. The group also played a surprising number of tracks from 2011’s The Whole Love, outdoing themselves on lead single of the time “I Might”, “Whole Love”, and “Dawned on Me”. Guitarist Nels Cline was in especially fine form on this sweltering afternoon, playing a number of extended gutbusting solos that even Tweedy was giving rounds of applause for.
Longtime friends Calexico were welcomed to the stage for tracks “California Stars”, which originated as a landmark collaboration with BIlly Bragg on unfinished Woody Guthrie compositions, then toward the end of the set for a rousing chorus of “I’m the Man That Loves You”. The bands have been playing together— whether it be sharing a bill, opening for the other, or running into each other on the festival circuit— for over ten years, and the recent album of a new Calexico album made the appearance that much sweeter.
What is there to say about Wilco that hasn’t been said already? They’re the band you can show to your mom that she won’t wrinkle a nose at, they still kick ass onstage, and we need a new album. Cut it and print it.

(photo from SPIN)

#33 WILCO (FRIDAY)

Legends in their own right by now, it’s no surprise that Wilco were the final act to take the What Stage before Paul McCartney on Friday night of Bonnaroo, but they remained in awe. With nearly twenty years of material to pull from, frontman Jeff Tweedy expressed nothing but shock and flattery that they’d been chosen during their nineteen-song set. For the most part, Wilco stuck to the hits— six tracks from iconic Yankee Hotel Foxtrot were played to the audiences’ chagrin, including sing-along tracks “I Am Trying To Break Your Heart” and “Jesus, Etc.”. 

Tweedy is, admittedly, getting on in years, but maintained the mellow that made him famous with light stage banter and a sweet thankfulness that one wouldn’t jump to when thinking of a Chicago rock star. The group also played a surprising number of tracks from 2011’s The Whole Love, outdoing themselves on lead single of the time “I Might”, “Whole Love”, and “Dawned on Me”. Guitarist Nels Cline was in especially fine form on this sweltering afternoon, playing a number of extended gutbusting solos that even Tweedy was giving rounds of applause for.

Longtime friends Calexico were welcomed to the stage for tracks “California Stars”, which originated as a landmark collaboration with BIlly Bragg on unfinished Woody Guthrie compositions, then toward the end of the set for a rousing chorus of “I’m the Man That Loves You”. The bands have been playing together— whether it be sharing a bill, opening for the other, or running into each other on the festival circuit— for over ten years, and the recent album of a new Calexico album made the appearance that much sweeter.

What is there to say about Wilco that hasn’t been said already? They’re the band you can show to your mom that she won’t wrinkle a nose at, they still kick ass onstage, and we need a new album. Cut it and print it.

— 1 year ago with 1 note
#Wilco  #Jeff Tweedy  #Bonnaroo  #Calexico  #Woody Guthrie  #Billy Bragg  #Jesus Etc  #yankee hotel foxtrot  #the whole love 
(photo from SPIN)
#32 DIRTY PROJECTORS (SUNDAY)
2012’s Swing Lo Magellan is undoubtedly ten-year Brooklyn vets Dirty Projectors’ finest hour thus far, and they’re riding it out with continued touring with it for nearly a year. Taking their set from last Sunday into consideration, hearing the set was very close to listening to the album the whole way through, with over half the set being pulled from the recent release. Though they debuted first in 2002, the majority of work they perform now is from the past six years due to the addition of pwerhouse lady vocals with added female vocals Amber Coffman, Haley Dekle, and Olga Bell assisting founding member David Longstrethand taking the wheel on tracks like “Two Doves” and “Simple Chord”. 
Longstreth has frequently been lauded as pretentious (he’s gone on the record on being impartial to Zappa and the Allmans), but there’s no denying he’s all about inclusion— when opening for “See What She Seeing”, he encouraged the guys in the audience to take their lady als a lift onto their shoulders. “I don’t imagine they can see much right now, let’s help ‘em out,” he insisted, and sixty-odd couples took him up on it.
Ladies hoisted high overhead, the Projectors didn’t invite any guests or debut a cover as is so common for festival favorites, but stuck to what works— that is, the SLM repertoire and late 2000’s hits like “Stillness is the Move” and closer “Impregnable Question”. Fans still seem split on the influx of ladies and I do wish Longstreth was open to doing a set with the old DP lineups, but this seems like a permanent shift. The good ol’ Projectors didn’t offer any curveballs this time around, but no surprise from a band this solid is still a million times better than a shocker from anybody else.

(photo from SPIN)

#32 DIRTY PROJECTORS (SUNDAY)

2012’s Swing Lo Magellan is undoubtedly ten-year Brooklyn vets Dirty Projectors’ finest hour thus far, and they’re riding it out with continued touring with it for nearly a year. Taking their set from last Sunday into consideration, hearing the set was very close to listening to the album the whole way through, with over half the set being pulled from the recent release. Though they debuted first in 2002, the majority of work they perform now is from the past six years due to the addition of pwerhouse lady vocals with added female vocals Amber Coffman, Haley Dekle, and Olga Bell assisting founding member David Longstrethand taking the wheel on tracks like “Two Doves” and “Simple Chord”. 

Longstreth has frequently been lauded as pretentious (he’s gone on the record on being impartial to Zappa and the Allmans), but there’s no denying he’s all about inclusion— when opening for “See What She Seeing”, he encouraged the guys in the audience to take their lady als a lift onto their shoulders. “I don’t imagine they can see much right now, let’s help ‘em out,” he insisted, and sixty-odd couples took him up on it.

Ladies hoisted high overhead, the Projectors didn’t invite any guests or debut a cover as is so common for festival favorites, but stuck to what works— that is, the SLM repertoire and late 2000’s hits like “Stillness is the Move” and closer “Impregnable Question”. Fans still seem split on the influx of ladies and I do wish Longstreth was open to doing a set with the old DP lineups, but this seems like a permanent shift. The good ol’ Projectors didn’t offer any curveballs this time around, but no surprise from a band this solid is still a million times better than a shocker from anybody else.

— 1 year ago with 7 notes
#Dirty Projectors  #swing lo magellan  #gun has no trigger  #Amber Coffman  #BOnnaroo